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Rethinking retirement in the “gig economy”

Rethinking retirement in the “gig economy”

There’s a movement going on in America, and it’s something retirees, and those even close to retirement, should start studying—hard. It’s called the “gig economy,” and it’s changing how people think about almost everything. Work. Play. And even the fine line in between the two. It’s changing how we pay and get paid for both, and it’s transforming how people look for work and how the work itself is getting done. Whether you’re looking for extra income to help fund your retirement, or you simply want to work to keep your mind and body active in your later years, understanding the gig economy and how it functions is vital to rethinking your retirement.

Anyone who has been forced to look for work recently can tell you firsthand how the gig economy has flipped the traditional work landscape on its head. Old-fashioned resumes have been replaced by LinkedIn profiles, and even the idea of finding a conventional “job” is fast becoming a thing of the past. Companies like Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb have provided a way for almost anyone to earn an income, as well as a whole new way for consumers to find and pay for services.

These companies aren’t alone. Today, there’s a website or an app that offers on-demand services of almost any kind imaginable. DoorDash delivers breakfast, lunch, or dinner from your favorite restaurant to your door at the click of a button. TaskRabbit lets you order up a “trusted and local handyman” within an hour. Dogvacay gives pet owners online access to 5-star pet sitters and dog walkers. And there are just as many services for professional freelancers. Upwork helps companies hire web developers, writers, accountants, and virtual assistants. Guru is the place to find professionals in management and finance, engineering and architecture, and sales and marketing. And UpCounsel is the go-to site for legal services.

Of course, every one of these services requires individuals to provide skills. Whether they are driving for Uber or DoorDash, putting together IKEA furniture, or helping a business crunch the numbers, these workers make up a growing workforce that is already in place. That means that if you thought serving up lattes at your local Starbucks was the only job in town for anyone “post-career,” you’re happily mistaken. The gig economy is taking over, and that’s good news—at least for those who get it and can adapt to this new reality.

The business school at UCI certainly gets it. My friend Howard Mirowitz is on the advisory board at the school’s new Beall Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The center is devoted entirely to inspiring innovation and entrepreneurship in the 21st century. Here students learn both why it’s important to become an entrepreneur, as well as the processes and tools to help turn that dream into a reality. The center fills a need that’s positively exploding. While being an entrepreneur may have sounded like a lofty dream a decade ago, it’s fast becoming mandatory for anyone hoping to succeed in an environment where it’s predicted that 43-50% of workers in the US will be freelancers by 2020. Let me repeat that: 43% to 50% of workers will be freelancers. Whatever your age, if you’re looking for work today, you are part of that statistic. Which means that now is the time to figure out what you have to offer the world and how that fits into what the world needs from you, and then begin to create your opportunities as part of this new, dynamic workforce.

For those of us who grew up in a business world where “climbing the corporate ladder” was the norm and playing by the rules led to a coveted lifetime pension, this new era can be pretty daunting. It requires flexibility and agility, not to mention a good dose of personal marketing savvy and technology know-how as well. So where do you start? It may be a moving target, but these five steps can help you take those first important steps:

  • Start to think differently.Rather than thinking about getting a “job,” make a list of all of your skills—both skills you learned in the traditional workplace and those you learned in life. Next, examine your list and circle the things you would like to continue doing and what someone else wants enough to pay you for. One of these skills may very well be your next “gig.”
     
  • Get a mentor.There’s no doubt about it: millennials have the gig economy down pat. To them, it’s just the way the world works now. If you need help figuring out how you can offer your skills, or even what skills people might be looking for, ask someone younger to serve as your mentor. You’ll be amazed at the knowledge they can offer.
     
  • Market yourself. Create a great LinkedIn profile that uses keywords that match your skill set to be sure people can find you online (learn all about LinkedIn keywords here). No, you don’t need to include dates that might “age” you or list every job you’ve ever had. Focus on what’s relevant to what you’re marketing today. If there’s already an on-demand service that matches your skills (think Upwork and Guru), explore how to get listed. There are even services which provide that service, helping to market everything from your Airbnb rental to your skills in human resources or healthcare.
     
  • Save madly.While there are many upsides to the gig economy, the downside is that it isn’t always consistent. Even if you do find the perfect niche, there may be off times when your services aren’t needed, or the need may change entirely, causing you to have to rethink your focus once again. Having a sizeable emergency fund can help offset potential gaps in income.
     
  • Be flexible.When I left my own corporate career, I realized there was a whole set of skills I needed to learn to succeed at my new goal. If you have some but not all of the skills you need for your new “job,” don’t let that scare you away. And if your interests change, know you have the freedom to change your work focus as well.

The gig economy may be replacing the traditional workplace, but what powers it are three things that will never be replaced: people, knowledge, and skills. By taking a look at the knowledge and skills you bring to the table, you may find that working in the gig economy can help your golden years shine that much brighter. How fun is that?!

 

 

 

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In Your Best Interest: Our Summer 2017 Newsletter

Click here to view the full newsletter, including recent news, important dates, financial tips & tools, and more.


MARKET HIGHLIGHTS: Q2 2017

 

“Global Stocks Post Strongest First Half in Years, Worry Investors.” That Wall Street Journal headline from the last day of Q2 caused more than a few investors (perhaps you included) to ponder “what’s next?” 

As we closed out the first half of the year, most indices were continuing to rise at a pace we haven’t seen since 2009. Despite certain political and global events that would have dampened investor exuberance in “the old days,” investors have been nothing but enthusiastic, and the economic data has certainly supported that fervor. Tumbling oil prices have driven down energy prices and inflation. The housing market seems to be gaining steam. And while growth in the GDP, inflation, and consumer spending has slowed, they are still showing modest increases. All of that, plus expected tax cuts, strong corporate balance sheets, and central bank support, seems to have outweighed any negative news and buoyed both the US and Global indices. The result: the Dow, NASDAQ, and S&P 500 are up 8.03%, 14.07%, and 8.24% respectively; and the Global Dow is up 9.54%. That strong economy spurred The Federal Reserve Bank to raise the Federal Funds rate another 1/4 point. 

So what can investors do to assuage their worries about the future? Jason Zweig’s interview with Peter L. Bernstein offers some answers. In the interview (which took place years before the Great Recession) Zweig asks: How can investors avoid being shocked, or at least reduce the risk of overreacting to a surprise? Bernstein responded with this wisdom: 

“Understanding that we do not know the future is such a simple statement, but it’s so important,” he said. “Survival is the only road to riches… I view diversification not only as a survival strategy but as an aggressive strategy because the next windfall might come from a surprising place. I want to make sure I’m exposed to it. Somebody once said that if you’re comfortable with everything you own, you’re not diversified.” 

Berstein then posed this question to investors: “Can you manage yourself in a bubble, and can you manage yourself on the other side?” 

I’m happy to say that our approach is consistent with Bernstein’s Yoda-like guidance. We continue to actively diversify our client portfolios, reallocating fixed income with international and global bonds, inflation-protected securities, and real estate. “Survival is the only road to riches.” And while no one knows what the future holds, we promise not to overreact—no matter what surprises come our way. ~

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Declare your (financial) freedom!

Declare your (financial) freedom!

As we head into the Fourth of July weekend, almost everyone I know is making plans for a celebration. Barbecues. Fireworks. Family and friends. It’s a time-honored tradition of celebrating the declaration of our independence from England way back in 1776. And while we should never take those liberties for granted, one thing that can give you a great reason to celebrate every day is your personal financial freedom.

Sound like an impossible dream? No matter what the state of your finances today, here are five steps to help pave your way toward true financial freedom:

  1. Freedom from illiteracy. According to this 2015 S&P Global Financial Literacy Study, nearly half of the U.S. population rates as financially illiterate. Financial illiteracy’s close companion, innumeracy, or mathematical illiteracy, is also a challenge. Even many highly educated people don’t understand the impact of compounding, the difference between “good debt” and “bad debt,” or why working with a financial fiduciary is vital to financial success. No matter where you are on the spectrum, make it your mission to be a lifetime learner when it comes to money, investing, and your finances. The more you know, the better your decisions will be. A great place to start: read How to Think About Money by Jonathan Clements. This easy read will have you on your way to worrying less about money, making smarter financial choices, and squeezing more happiness out of every dollar.
     
  2. Freedom from chaos. If your financial files are in a constant state of chaos, you can bet your financial life is in pretty bad shape as well. No matter what the reason, know this: you’re not alone. Finances are complicated, but the longer you procrastinate, the more complex the challenge will be. If you can’t get yourself to dive into that growing stack of papers, or if you simply don’t know where or how to begin, set your pride aside and reach out to your financial advisor to get help now. Need more inspiration? Read my blog For your finances, getting organized can be the greatest challenge.
     
  3. Freedom from debt. Debt is a huge problem in the US. In 2017, the average US household held more than $8,000 in credit card debt, up 6% from last year. And that doesn’t even include auto loans and other “bad debt” which, in contrast to “good debt” such as a home mortgage, student loans, and business loans, doesn’t have the potential to generate benefits over time. Because “bad debt” reduces your income, adds no value to your wealth, and forces you to pay more every month for an item that is losing value, it’s one of biggest threats to your financial freedom. Use a debt snowball to reduce and eliminate the debt you have today, and avoid taking on more debt in the future. For more on how debt can impact your future, read my blog There’s no such thing as an unexpected expense.
     
  4. Freedom from mindless spending. Financial independence requires understanding that every dollar matters, and being mindful about how you spend each and every dollar you have. Does that mean every dollar has to be relegated to paying down debt or saving for the future? No. But it does mean creating a budget to plan how much you need to save and how much you can spend every month. By creating a cash budget, you’ll already feel liberated because you’ll be in charge of your finances, instead of letting your finances be in charge of you. To dive deeper into budgeting and learn how making mindful choices with your money can help you relax about your finances, read my blog Cold, hard cash! (Are you paying attention?).
     
  5. Freedom from the unexpected. A recent survey from Bankrate revealed that 57% of Americans don’t have enough cash to cover a $500 unexpected expense. If you too are living paycheck to paycheck, it’s time to create a “freedom fund” to cover 6-12 months of living expenses. While that may sound like a lot of cash, think of it like paying off a debt to your future self now, build it into your budget, and pay yourself first every month. Once your “freedom fund” is at the ready, you’ll be amazed by the sense of relief you’ll experience when you’re no longer living paycheck to paycheck. Want to learn more about this approach? See my blog Celebrate retirement planning week: Create a “freedom fund.”

Financial independence isn’t only for the wealthy. By being mindful about your finances now, you can intentionally work toward a level of freedom that ensures you can always stand on your own two feet. Best of all you’ll have financial peace of mind so you can relax about your money. That’s the kind of freedom you’ll want to celebrate every day of your life! If you need help getting there, I’m always here to help!

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Are you ready to become an investing Wonder Woman?

Are you ready to become an investing Wonder Woman?

The new Wonder Woman movie broke every box office record last weekend, and critics and audiences continue to shout praises, calling it one of the most entertaining—and empowering—movies this year. I had a great time seeing it myself, and while I’m no critic, I thought it was the perfect summer treat: a big, noisy movie with a woman super hero. What could be better?!

But while yes, having the power to win the battle of evil in the “war to end all wars” would be pretty great, what I really wish is that I could give every woman Diana-level confidence in a superpower she already has today. That superpower, of course, is investing.

Here’s the great news for all you warriors out there: Another study just came out that showed that women are better at investing than men. That’s something to celebrate! As a group, we plan better, we take less risk, and (this should be no news to anyone!) we’re more patient—and these are all factors that add up to larger returns in the world of investing. But here’s the not-so-good news: we lack the confidence of Diana. Despite the data, women continue to see men as better, smarter investors. Among 1,500 women polled last December, only 9% thought women would earn a bigger year-end return than men. That’s a disconnect that matters. After all, if we don’t see ourselves as smart investors, how can we ever overcome the earnings gap and finally take control of our own finances?

Whether you’re one of the doubters or you have complete confidence on your investing skills, here are five things every woman can do today to become an investing Wonder Woman:

  1. Own the fact that you have the mindset to be a wise investor.
    Diana has the skills to fight evil. You have what it takes to be a great investor. Know this. Research shows that when women take the helm for our own retirement planning, we tend to be smarter, more levelheaded investors. And yet in most families, men have the trusted relationship with a financial advisor, while women take on the role of a “financial child” in the household. It’s time to take a different path. Trust that you have what it takes to make smart investment decisions, and talk to your advisor yourself to be sure your investments address your own needs and are aligned with your own values. And if you need to build up your knowledge of the basics, start with my blog post When did it become ok to be financially illiterate?
     
  2. Make retirement planning your number-one priority.
    Longevity is a huge issue for women. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, women can expect to live about five years longer than men. At the same time, between taking time off to care for children and our own aging parents, a persistent wage gap that reduces our take-home pay as well as our future Social Security payments, and a historically lower pay rate, we typically have fewer resources to fund our longer lives. That means it’s critical that you start planning for retirement as early as possible. While you may not be able to overcome some of the gender barriers that can haunt any woman’s account balance, the combination of persistence and compounding can help close that gap.
     
  3. Pay your future self first.
    If you’re like most women, it’s easy to put saving for retirement on the back burner. But let’s face it: there will always be bills to pay and extra expenses to manage. To be sure your retirement doesn’t get lost in the financial shuffle, work with your advisor to determine how much you need to save, and then set a schedule to pay yourself first—every month. The more automated your contributions can be, the better. And rather than feeling deprived, think of that savings as a “freedom fund” for your future self. A June 2016 studyshowed that 83% of women in the US aren't saving enough for retirement. Don’t represent that statistic! By being diligent now, you can create your own financial freedom—no matter how you choose to spend your time later in life.
     
  4. Make conscious decisions about 'image' purchases.
    As a professional woman and business owner, I know all too well how expensive the societal pressures can be for women to spend on our images. We are judged by appearances much more than men, so the cost of a wardrobe, manicures, haircuts, and more can take a very real bite out of every paycheck—which is already smaller than a man's. (Just ask Hillary Clinton, who has said she was thrilled to put away her makeup after losing her Presidential bid last year; I doubt any male candidates felt the same relief!) It's a double standard, and whether you are paying your bill at Nordstrom or the plastic surgeon, it all adds up. Remember: your image is important, but that doesn't mean you need a Prada suit to look your best. Decide which purchases are necessities, which are optional, and be honest about what you can really afford.
     
  5. Fight like a superhero for equal pay!
    Women still earn less than 100% of a man’s dollar, and that will likely never change without pay visibility. For decades, corporations have promoted a culture of secrecy about pay. This reality puts women and minorities at a distinct disadvantage. After all, how can we advocate for ourselves if we don’t even know what our co-workers earn? By removing the taboos around pay transparency, we can end this inequality once and for all. At the same time, we need to start placing a real, tangible economic value on caring for children and aging parents—work that is largely taken on by women. By offering benefits such as disability insurance, health insurance, and Social Security credits for this very real and necessary work, we can finally begin to recognize that the care being provided is a valuable part of the fabric of our community and our society as a whole.

Women can be great investors, but our mindset alone isn’t enough to change our trajectory. Just like Diana, Princess of the Amazon, we need to take real action. We need to see ourselves as the smart investors we are, focus on saving for our own futures, and balance our need to create a great image with our need to gain a greater financial advantage. And we need to fight the good fight for equal pay—even if it takes Diana’s God-killer Sword and Lasso of Truth to spur on salary transparency! Lastly, even Wonder Woman counts on the rest of the Justice League to help her succeed. Find a team you trust, and start taking control of your financial life today. Your future self will thank you for taking your job as an investing Wonder Woman seriously—no shield required.

Photo: TM © 2017 DC Comics

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Ready to be a successful investor? It’s time to rewire your brain

Ready to be a successful investor? It’s time to rewire your brain

If I asked you to make a list of your biggest financial mistakes, what would be on it? Overspending today and not saving for tomorrow? Taking on too much debt? Pulling your money out of a down market, or being guilty of too much hubris when the market was up? Investing in that “sure thing” that wasn’t so sure after all?

No, I’m not psychic. (If I were, I’d most certainly have beaten the market into the ground years ago!) The sad truth is that everyone can add at least one of those mistakes to their list at one time or another. Why? Because so many of the most common mistakes stem from the fact that we are hardwired for financial failure. And hardwiring is extremely tough to fight.

Jonathan Clements does a great job explaining this phenomenon in his most recent book, How to Think About Money. I covered Clements’s Steps 1 and 2 in my blog posts Money really can buy happiness and How long do you plan to live (and are you planning for it?), and while those steps were certainly important, Step 3, Rewire Your Brain, deals with issues I see my clients struggle with every day.The good news according to Clements (and I wholeheartedly agree) is that it is possible to be more sensible about how we manage our money, but changing that wiring takes great mental strength. Rewiring does not mean you need to be smarter or more educated than anyone else—you just need to stay focused on the right things at the right time. Here are four things you can start doing today to start to change your thought patterns and truly begin to think differently about money:

  1. Save like crazy. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? But unfortunately, our brains aren’t nearly as rational as we’d like to think. Many people lack the self-control not to overspend, so they take on too much debt. My friend Lydia was always one of the most “fabulous” people I knew. She always had the best clothes, the cutest shoes, and the fanciest car. But Lydia was a victim of her own fabulousness. While she was dressing to impress, she wasn’t saving enough for retirement. Now in her late 60s, she has to continue to work—not by choice, but by necessity. In contrast, there’s the story of Carol Sue Snowden, a librarian who lived modestly and then made headlines for gifting the library where she worked over a million dollars in her will. As Clements says, “Growing wealthy is ridiculously simple, but it isn’t easy.” It requires saving early, saving often, and focusing on becoming wealthy tomorrow—not appearing wealthy today.
     
  2. Embrace humility. Are you a victim of the Lake Wobegon Effect? In Garrison Keillor’s fictional town of Lake Wobegon, “all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average.” The Lake Wobegon effect is the tendency to overestimate your capabilities and see yourself as better than others, and it’s a common affliction. The antidote? Embrace humility—and require anyone managing your money to do the same. Because when it comes to investing, average is good! But our hardwired brains want so badly to be above average that we feel a need to beat the market, or we hire someone who says they can beat it for us. But historically, active investors lag the market indexes. That means that “buying and holding” almost always wins in the end. While your neighbor may be bursting with the news of an approach that helped him beat today’s market, you can bet he’ll be quiet as a mouse when his returns fall behind. “The meek may not inherit the earth,” says Clements, “but they are far much more likely retire in comfort.”
     
  3. Find value. If you find it difficult to ignore fluctuations in the market, you’re not alone. It can be a challenge to turn off that voice in your head that starts making noise when the market dips. Remember this: your goal is to seek long-term value in your portfolio. Ultimately, the market is efficient (really!), and that efficiency makes it extremely difficult for anyone—even the most seasoned money managers—to beat the market over the long term. Focus on investments that are poised to deliver value, and then stay put. (For more on how to win this battle with your brain, see my blog post Market volatility making you crazy? 5 tips to managing your emotions.)
     
  4. Stay grounded. When the market does bounce around (and considerable bounces are inevitable), think like a smart shopper: when the market is down, the companies who offer stock haven’t fundamentally changed, which means their stock is on sale! Avoid mental errors such as over-confidence, loss-avoidance, anchoring, confirmation bias, and more. Stay focused on the long term, secure in the knowledge that market prices of securities will fluctuate, often wildly, in the short term. Over decades, the trajectory has always been up. By staying grounded in the knowledge that you own shares in real businesses whose value is derived from dividend yields and earnings growth, you will achieve the investment success to which you are entitled.

It’s natural: every time you think about money, your hard-wired, reptilian brain tells you that your very survival is threatened. But in this case, following your instincts may be the very worst thing you can do, leading to financial mistakes that can truly threaten your future. It requires great mental effort to save, stay humble, find value, and stay grounded, but by challenging your thought patterns, you can train yourself to think differently about money and help drive your own success.  And if you need help with the rewiring, give me a call. I’m here to help!

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All written content on this site is for information purposes only. Opinions expressed herein are solely those of Lauren S. Klein, President, Klein Financial Advisors, Inc. Material presented is believed to be from reliable sources and we make no representations as to its accuracy or completeness. Read More >