A | A | A

label1 label2

Lauren's Blog

Lauren’s blog covers topics that impact your finances, your family, and your future. Is there a topic you’d like Lauren to tackle? We’d love your suggestions and feedback.

Now more than ever, focus on your Circle of Influence

Now more than ever, focus on your Circle of Influence

When I walked into my early morning Pilates class on Monday, I couldn’t decipher the expression on my instructor’s face. Was it compassion? Pain? Despair? “What’s wrong?” I asked. Her answer: “Las Vegas.”

I was fortunate that I’d had a more peaceful Monday morning than is typical for me. My iPad had gone missing, so I hadn’t checked my news feed or social media at all. Blissfully unaware of the tragic events of Sunday night, I spent my pre-workout hour reading an old standby: Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. As I sipped my coffee, Covey had been introducing the idea that being proactive means focusing on the things we can control—even in what seem to be dire circumstances. It’s amazing how things seem to come along at just the right time, even when you least expect it.

I was rereading the book to help manage my own “Post-Election Stress Disorder,” but Covey’s words hold some wisdom for all of us when the headlines are filled with news of one catastrophe after another. In just the past few weeks we’ve seen nine million children lose health insurance when Congress let the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) expire, protesters clash in Charlottesville, hurricanes and floods devastate communities in the southern US, Cuba, and Puerto Rico, and earthquakes kill scores of people in Mexico. Then Las Vegas happened, and we seem to drown in the negative…again.

But there is an alternative.

If you haven’t already discovered Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, let me introduce you to the first of the seven habits. It is an important one, especially after this “September to Remember.”

Habit #1: Be Proactive

According to Covey, being proactive means taking action, but it also means taking responsibility for your own life by actively choosing where to focus your attention. He stresses that our ability to be self-aware—to consciously stand apart from ourselves to observe what we’re doing and why, and to examine the way we see ourselves—is uniquely human. Unlike animals that simply react to stimulus in the world around them, we have a choice.

What a wonderful realization.

He also talks about “reactive people” who are driven by feelings, circumstances, conditions, and environment; and “proactive people” who are driven by carefully considered, selected and internalized values. To become more proactive, look where you focus your time and energy. All the things you care about—Las Vegas, Puerto Rico, the flag, politics, your children, money, health, and more—lie within what he calls your Circle of Concern. Next, look at each of those things and identify the ones that you can actively affect, or what Covey calls your Circle of Influence.

Stephen Covey quotes Viktor Frankl who said, “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” On Monday morning, many people were paralyzed by the tragic events in the news. Others chose to be proactive and act within their Circle of Influence. They got in line to donate blood for the victims. They offered transportation and housing to anyone and everyone affected by the shooting. Even during the shooting, people risked their own lives to save others. What an inspiration to us all.

There will always be tragedies in our world, but I wonder how things would change if every one of us could be more proactive—if, as Covey suggests, we each took responsibility for how we reacted to the world around us and focused on driving change within our Circles of Influence. I expect we’d all be more effective. And the world would be a better place.

This concept is also true when it comes to effectively managing your finances. While many events lie within your Circle of Concern—market corrections, inflation, gas prices, black swan events—you cannot influence their outcome. Know what you can control and strive to focus on your Circle of Influence: keep your fixed costs low, maintain sufficient emergency funds, select an appropriate risk profile, and have a solid financial plan in place.

By focusing our positive energy in the right place and acting wisely, each one of us has the power to be more proactive, more effective, and drive positive change in our own lives and in the world around us. Now is the time.

Continue reading
530 Hits
0 Comments

Ready to be a successful investor? It’s time to rewire your brain

Ready to be a successful investor? It’s time to rewire your brain

If I asked you to make a list of your biggest financial mistakes, what would be on it? Overspending today and not saving for tomorrow? Taking on too much debt? Pulling your money out of a down market, or being guilty of too much hubris when the market was up? Investing in that “sure thing” that wasn’t so sure after all?

No, I’m not psychic. (If I were, I’d most certainly have beaten the market into the ground years ago!) The sad truth is that everyone can add at least one of those mistakes to their list at one time or another. Why? Because so many of the most common mistakes stem from the fact that we are hardwired for financial failure. And hardwiring is extremely tough to fight.

Jonathan Clements does a great job explaining this phenomenon in his most recent book, How to Think About Money. I covered Clements’s Steps 1 and 2 in my blog posts Money really can buy happiness and How long do you plan to live (and are you planning for it?), and while those steps were certainly important, Step 3, Rewire Your Brain, deals with issues I see my clients struggle with every day.The good news according to Clements (and I wholeheartedly agree) is that it is possible to be more sensible about how we manage our money, but changing that wiring takes great mental strength. Rewiring does not mean you need to be smarter or more educated than anyone else—you just need to stay focused on the right things at the right time. Here are four things you can start doing today to start to change your thought patterns and truly begin to think differently about money:

  1. Save like crazy. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? But unfortunately, our brains aren’t nearly as rational as we’d like to think. Many people lack the self-control not to overspend, so they take on too much debt. My friend Lydia was always one of the most “fabulous” people I knew. She always had the best clothes, the cutest shoes, and the fanciest car. But Lydia was a victim of her own fabulousness. While she was dressing to impress, she wasn’t saving enough for retirement. Now in her late 60s, she has to continue to work—not by choice, but by necessity. In contrast, there’s the story of Carol Sue Snowden, a librarian who lived modestly and then made headlines for gifting the library where she worked over a million dollars in her will. As Clements says, “Growing wealthy is ridiculously simple, but it isn’t easy.” It requires saving early, saving often, and focusing on becoming wealthy tomorrow—not appearing wealthy today.
     
  2. Embrace humility. Are you a victim of the Lake Wobegon Effect? In Garrison Keillor’s fictional town of Lake Wobegon, “all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average.” The Lake Wobegon effect is the tendency to overestimate your capabilities and see yourself as better than others, and it’s a common affliction. The antidote? Embrace humility—and require anyone managing your money to do the same. Because when it comes to investing, average is good! But our hardwired brains want so badly to be above average that we feel a need to beat the market, or we hire someone who says they can beat it for us. But historically, active investors lag the market indexes. That means that “buying and holding” almost always wins in the end. While your neighbor may be bursting with the news of an approach that helped him beat today’s market, you can bet he’ll be quiet as a mouse when his returns fall behind. “The meek may not inherit the earth,” says Clements, “but they are far much more likely retire in comfort.”
     
  3. Find value. If you find it difficult to ignore fluctuations in the market, you’re not alone. It can be a challenge to turn off that voice in your head that starts making noise when the market dips. Remember this: your goal is to seek long-term value in your portfolio. Ultimately, the market is efficient (really!), and that efficiency makes it extremely difficult for anyone—even the most seasoned money managers—to beat the market over the long term. Focus on investments that are poised to deliver value, and then stay put. (For more on how to win this battle with your brain, see my blog post Market volatility making you crazy? 5 tips to managing your emotions.)
     
  4. Stay grounded. When the market does bounce around (and considerable bounces are inevitable), think like a smart shopper: when the market is down, the companies who offer stock haven’t fundamentally changed, which means their stock is on sale! Avoid mental errors such as over-confidence, loss-avoidance, anchoring, confirmation bias, and more. Stay focused on the long term, secure in the knowledge that market prices of securities will fluctuate, often wildly, in the short term. Over decades, the trajectory has always been up. By staying grounded in the knowledge that you own shares in real businesses whose value is derived from dividend yields and earnings growth, you will achieve the investment success to which you are entitled.

It’s natural: every time you think about money, your hard-wired, reptilian brain tells you that your very survival is threatened. But in this case, following your instincts may be the very worst thing you can do, leading to financial mistakes that can truly threaten your future. It requires great mental effort to save, stay humble, find value, and stay grounded, but by challenging your thought patterns, you can train yourself to think differently about money and help drive your own success.  And if you need help with the rewiring, give me a call. I’m here to help!

Continue reading
741 Hits
0 Comments

Index

09 November 2016

Contact Us

4299 MacArthur Boulevard
Suite 100
Newport Beach, CA 92660
Phone: 949-477-4990
Fax: 714-464-4481
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Directions

Disclosure

All written content on this site is for information purposes only. Opinions expressed herein are solely those of Lauren S. Klein, President, Klein Financial Advisors, Inc. Material presented is believed to be from reliable sources and we make no representations as to its accuracy or completeness. Read More >