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New parents: Know the true costs before choosing to stay at home

New parents: Know the true costs before choosing to stay at home

Gail Hicks is a senior financial advisor at Klein Financial Advisors. She is this week’s guest blogger while Lauren is away on vacation.


It’s a question almost every soon-to-be parent ponders: should I stay at home after the baby is born? And if so, for how long? Even for the most career-driven parent, it can be a very emotional decision. To come up with the right answer for you, step beyond a basic pros-and-cons list. Be certain you’re considering every piece of the puzzle before making a choice—and do all you can to be sure that choice balances your emotions with what’s best for the long-term financial stability of your family.

If you think that puzzle is a simple one, think again. It’s easy to look at the high cost of childcare and assume that those costs, combined with the savings on everything from dry cleaning to taxes to eating out after a long day at the office, make staying at home the most cost-effective option. That’s rarely the case.The truth is in the data. According to a recent study by the think tank Center for American Progress (CAP), the average 26-year-old woman who takes a 5-year break from her career will lose much more than five years of her salary. In fact, when considering lost income, wage growth, and retirement assets and benefits during just five years, she’ll lose a whopping $467,000 over her lifetime. A man of the same age will lose even more: just under $600,000. To make those numbers more personal (especially knowing that Orange County is one of the most expensive places to live in the US) assume that staying at home will cost up to five times your annual salary for every year you’re out of the workforce. According to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Expenditures on Children by Families report, households with income over $105,000 should be prepared to spend at least $400,000 to raise a child to age 18. With that price tag in mind, it’s a challenge to make staying at home an affordable option!

Of course for some parents, the math isn’t enough to sway the emotional desire to stay home with children. For others, there are family and cultural biases that strongly influence the decision. But it’s vital to look closely at the reality of your choice before opting to leave the workforce. As someone who has been there myself, I know the real-world challenges all too well.

When my husband and I were contemplating expanding our family from one child to two, we remembered the toll my job took on my health during my first pregnancy, including a very frightening pre-term labor that resulted in being put on bed rest at seven months. The high cost of childcare and the fact that we had no family in the area to help out were also factors to consider as we considered our options. We did the math (it’s what I do, after all!), and determined that with our savings and the extra income from my husband’s side business, we could make it work. We knew there would be sacrifices, but it was an important—and yes, emotional—decision for us both. So I walked away from a high-paying corporate job and walked into stay-at-home parenthood.

Unfortunately, the decision didn’t play out in real life as well as it had on paper. First, our second son was born with a mild disability. That alone tipped the financial and emotional scales. Jumping through hoops to get a diagnosis and then therapy two or three times a week was hard. Soon afterward, the recession hit, and with it came the end of the consulting income we had counted on to help replace my salary. Even worse, my husband didn’t want to add any more stress to an already high-stress situation, so he postponed admitting that his side business had completely dried up. Our plan of just breaking even quickly turned into the reality of taking on debt. Now the numbers didn’t make sense. How could I go back to work when my younger son needed me at home and my older son had grown accustomed to having me at home with him too?

At the same time, I was in a world of the unknown. I’d been a businesswoman my entire life. I was home with a special-needs child, I knew only a handful of my neighbors, and the few stay-at-home moms I was able to meet had never worked, so our experiences were completely different. I felt isolated and alone. And while it was a difficult choice to go back to work, money was just one piece of the equation. I was confident my choice would be best for our whole family, and it truly was. Within months of going back to work, I felt we had found balance again. Yes, I missed the time with my sons, but I knew I was a better mother when we were together as I watched the financial and emotional stresses wash away.

Everyone’s situation is different. The key to making the best choice for you is to understand the true financial impact of staying at home, and then to decide what makes sense for you and your family—both today and over the long term. How can you be sure your emotions aren’t overriding your common sense? Work with a professional advisor to help you crunch the numbers and be sure you’re really considering every piece of the puzzle.


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Ready to retire? Consider taking the road less traveled

Ready to retire? Consider taking the road less traveled

It’s inevitable. You tell your friends you’re retiring and the first question out of their mouths is, “What are your plans?” Question number two: “Where are you going?” It seems the connection between travel and retirement has become an obsession in our society. And while it may conjure up images of tropical destinations and “once in a lifetime” adventures, the dream doesn’t always reflect the reality.

My friend Joyce is a perfect example. After working in corporate healthcare for decades, ten years ago she was finally ready to call an end to her career. Of course, the questions and suggestions began immediately: “Where are you off to? Have you thought about a cruise?” “You should go on a safari! It’s the trip of a lifetime!” “We loved Capri! You just have to go!” “You’ve never been to Paris?” Joyce had already traveled a fair amount in her life, for work and pleasure, so the idea of planning a big retirement trip wasn’t even on her radar. Suddenly the pressure was on. She started to feel like she had to travel—it was, after all, what retirees are expected to do.

When we met for coffee a week after her retirement party, she was restless. “I don’t even know where I want to go, but I feel like I should figure it out soon. I’m already bored with my routine!”

It’s a dilemma I see all the time. As retirement looms, people are so focused on closing the door on their careers that they don’t take the time to think about what’s next. They know they’re not ready to settle into a rocking chair, but they have no idea how they want to spend their days.

To help guide Joyce, I posed a question that was much different than, “What’s your travel destination?” Instead, I asked, “What do you want to do in your second half of life?” Joyce looked like a deer in the headlights. I took a sip of my coffee and continued. “Is there anything you’ve dreamed of doing, but have simply never had the time—not including traveling?” We sat quietly for a few minutes, and I could see the wheels turning in her mind. When she did speak, she seemed almost embarrassed, as though she was confessing a dark secret. “Paint,” she said. “I’d love to paint.”

Joyce’s vision was no standard image of an elderly gentlewoman quietly painting landscapes on a sunny hillside. Her dream was to paint large, bold canvasses that would take people’s breath away. I could already picture her in paint-covered overalls tossing paint onto the canvas like a modern-day Helen Frankenthaler. She didn’t know her next step, but she now had a vision in her mind, and it had nothing to do with jumping on a retiree-filled cruise ship.

Don’t go me wrong. I’ve recently discovered my love for travel, and I get that, at least for some people, travel is a retirement dream come true. Even then, I’ve seen peer pressure turn what should be a time of financial freedom into a whole new level of stress and anxiety. Travel anxiety can be especially challenging for anyone who lives in an affluent area, and even more so for affluent couples who set out on their travels together. Suddenly, what could have been a modest, budget-conscious Alaskan cruise morphs into a five-star, luxury journey on the Crystal line—for five times the original cost. The pressure to overspend can come from relatives as well. Knowing that memories are important, it’s all the rage right now for grandma and grandpa to treat the entire family to an all-expenses-paid family vacation, yet few retirees can afford this level of extravagance. I’m all for spending money on experiences instead of “things,” but it’s important to be realistic. If a trip is beyond your budget, that’s the moment you need to stop and ask yourself: whose dream am I living? Mine—or my neighbor’s? Peer pressure can be tremendous, but swallow your ego and make choices that align with your dreams and your budget.

Joyce’s story has a wonderful outcome. After our talk that morning, she decided to make her dream come true. She signed up for classes at Otis College of Art and Design, studied with master teachers, and earned a certificate in Fine Arts. She’s been painting ever since, and though I have yet to see her in overalls (I guess that’s my version of her dream, not hers!), she’s happier than I’ve ever seen her. She does travel a bit, but mostly to New York City on artist trips. By focusing on what she truly wanted, she took the road less traveled (pun intended!) and painted a beautiful “retirement” that even she never saw coming.

If you’re on the cusp of retirement—or even already there—take some time today to brainstorm how you want to spend the next decade of your life. Build a vision board. Journal. And don’t let anyone else’s expectations stand in your way. Once you have some ideas, I recommend sitting down with your financial advisor to figure out a realistic budget, and then take it from there. By charting a path based on your dreams and your finances, you can paint your own picture of a wonderfully fulfilling retirement that’s free of financial anxiety. That’s what I call the “golden years”!

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There’s no such thing as an unexpected expense!

There’s no such thing as an unexpected expense!

When I met Carolyn for the first time in January, she was distraught. What finally got her to pick up the phone and get financial help was this year’s extreme rainy season—and a big financial surprise. “I didn’t even realize how old my roof was, or that it needed repair, until the water started coming in!” And come in it did. Carolyn had been out of town on business when the leaks opened up, and her home was a mess by the time she found it three days later. Her homeowner's insurance was covering the interior damage (minus a hefty deductible), but she was told she needed a whole new roof. The cost: $22,000. A high-earning corporate executive, Carolyn had lots of credit, but her emergency fund was non-existent, and a new roof was one thing she couldn’t put on a credit card and pay off over the next few months. She needed cash, and she needed it now. “I thought I was in great shape financially,” she told me. “Who knew I’d need so much cash with no notice?”

The answer? I knew. Or at least I could have provided a pretty close estimate, even though I’d never met Carolyn until she walked through my office door that afternoon. I’m no psychic (if I were, there’d be no need for financial planning!). How did I know Carolyn would need that much cash for a home repair? It’s all in the numbers. It’s all in the budget. I repeat: There’s no such thing as an unexpected expense!

All I needed to know was this: Carolyn owns a home in Newport Beach. If her home is worth anything close to the median price of about $2M, a 1-percent rule tells me that her home maintenance will average about 1% of the purchase price of her home—or $20,000—per year. Suddenly $22,000 doesn’t sound that surprising at all! But without a budget, every expense was unexpected. Without a budget, Carolyn didn’t have a clue.

The 1-percent “rule” means that when you purchase a large, illiquid, expensive-to-own asset like a personal residence, almost everything will have to be repaired or replaced eventually. I guide people to set aside a replacement fund of 1% of the purchase price each year for these very predictable costs. The work may not occur each year. It could be a roof, a kitchen, a driveway, plumbing… but it will be something. It always is.

The new roof is just a drop in the bucket (pun intended) when it comes to Carolyn’s money challenges. She was earning a substantial income but wasn’t setting aside cash for irregular discretionary expenses. She had no revolving debt, and she was saving for retirement. But her cash flow planning was a non-starter. In hindsight, maybe her leaking roof was a good thing; it was just the wake-up call she needed to get her to take action.

We began by finding the cash she needed to fix her roof (thank goodness for her good credit and a good chunk of home equity!). But we didn’t stop there. Next, we worked together to create a budget so she knows what she earns, what she spends, and what she can afford. She began to use eMoney (my favorite personal financial management software) to be sure she stays on track. She’s now building an emergency fund rather than relying on credit cards, and she’s earmarking cash reserves for those not-so-surprising expenses such as car replacements, home repairs, annual vacations, and even a planned future nip-and-tuck. The next time a large expense hits her, I have no doubt she’ll have the funds in place to cover the bill.

What Carolyn has discovered is that cash planning is the foundation for a solid financial plan. A cash budget creates a wonderful sense of financial freedom. “I always thought budgeting was like dieting—that I’d always feel deprived—so I just didn't look at how I was spending,” she told me. “Now, I feel the exact opposite. Because I know how much I have and where I want to use it, I don’t get stressed about an expensive dinner that I know is in the budget. Even better, I know I’ll never have surprises, and I don’t worry when I see my credit card statement arrive!” She’s also building a “freedom fund” to be sure she has the funds to support her dreams down the road, whatever they may be. (Read my blog Celebrate Retirement Planning Week: Create a “freedom fund” to learn more!)

Like many of my clients, Carolyn has discovered one of the great financial secrets: cash planning is empowering. Remember, there’s no such thing as an unexpected expense! Making intentional, conscious choices about when, where, and how to spend your hard-earned dollars is key. Align what you want with what you need and (finally!) relax about your finances.

Ready to get started? Check out 7 Steps to a Budget Made Easyor use NAPFA’s find an advisor guideto find a fee-only financial advisor near you.

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Money really can buy happiness!

Money really can buy happiness!

We’ve all heard it said a million times: money can’t buy happiness. Well, I’m here to tell you some great news! It seems money can buy happiness after all. There’s a catch, though. It doesn’t happen in the way you might think. But stop. Let me back up for a minute to share with you how all this started swimming around in my head, and why I can’t stop thinking about it.

Last weekend, I had some precious time to read, and I picked up Jonathan Clements’s book How to Think About Money. What drew me to the title wasn’t Clements himself, or even the fact that I’m always up for new ideas about money and finance. The attraction was the fact that William J. Bernstein wrote the foreword to the book, and I’m a big fan of his. (His book If You Can: How Millennials Can Get Rich Slowly is simply fantastic.) So I dove in, and I am absolutely thrilled I did. One of the reviews of the book called it “financial feng shui,” and I agree completely. The book includes five steps covering “how to think about money.” The first step covers (you guessed it) happiness. Specifically, how to buy more happiness. If you thought it wasn’t possible, Clements offers some valuable food for thought.

First, he points out that we simply aren’t very good at figuring out what will make us happy. That’s probably no news to anyone. So many of us live the majority of our lives doing work we don’t enjoy, commuting way too many hours of every day to get to that work, and then coming home exhausted to a home that costs us way too much time, energy, and money to afford and maintain. Clements recognized the conundrum, and he turned to research on happiness to put the pieces of the puzzle together. Here are just a handful of the things he learned from the academics:

  1. “Money can buy happiness, but not nearly as much as we imagine.” 
    All of us have purchases that make us happy, but how happy do they make us over the long term? Is buying the new car more exciting than how we feel driving it six months down the road (pun intended!)? And how dependent is our happiness on our own comparison of the “stuff” we own compared to our friends and neighbors? I may be thrilled with my new Hyundai…until I look around and see myself surrounded by BMWs and Mercedes. And yet, if my parents always drove older cars because they couldn’t afford new ones, I may feel thrilled to realize I’ve upped the ante, at least in this regard. Happiness is complicated! But ultimately it’s up to us to choose how we lead our lives—including how we live and, yes, how we spend our money.

  2. “We’re often happier when we have less choice, not more.” 
    Think about it: decisions are stressful! Even little things like deciding what to wear each morning can cause some stress. Bigger decisions—like where to live or which job to take—can keep us up at night and lead to some very real anxiety. I remember when I first read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo, I was struck by just how much stuff I’d accumulated… and spent my hard-earned money on! When I started asking myself if all of these belongings really “sparked joy,” I was surprised at how little of them did. (For more thoughts on getting rid of all that stuff, read my blog It’s that time of year: change is on the horizon.) Ultimately, it’s not the stuff that brings us joy. There’s something much better that money can buy.

  3. “We place too high a value on possessions and not enough on experiences.” 
    So if our “stuff” doesn’t define us and make us happy, what does? Experiences. Specifically, experiences with family and friends. Interestlingly, anticipation is a big part of the equation. I know when I’m planning a vacation, the anticipation is half the joy! But even more, experiences create memories that become part of the fabric of who we are. At Christmas, I decided to take my whole family to see Disney’s wonderful new movie Moana. We all went together, sat in the big, comfy seats, munched on treats, and had a great time. Every one of us walked out of the theater happy and filled with memories that will last a very long time. Was it expensive? Yes! But no more than an Apple watch. And while my grandson may have been happy in the moment as he slipped a new watch on his wrist, I know this experience was much more worthwhile. It made us all truly happy.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg— just step one out of five—but I hope it’s enough to get your wheels turning and wondering “what really makes me happy?” Everyone wants and needs to have enough money to live. That’s a given. But how we spend that money really can buy us happiness, but only if we make careful, deliberate choices based on what will bring us happiness over the long term.

I must add that being able to make these choices in the first place requires achieving some level of wealth to begin with. As Clements writes in his introduction, “Growing wealthy is embarrassingly simple: We save as much as we reasonably can, take on debt cautiously, limit our exposure to major financial risks, and try not to be too clever with our investing.” And if that seems simple, but not easy, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . As always, I’m here to help!

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Cold, hard cash! (Are you paying attention?)

Cold, hard cash! (Are you paying attention?)

Cash. It’s by far the most important piece of wealth management. And yet it is often the very last thing most people want to focus on. Time and time again, when I sit down with a new client, the first thing on their agenda is reviewing their account statements, while the first thing on my agenda—always—is to take a look at how they’re spending and saving their hard-earned cash. It’s not the sexy part of finance, but much like building that less-than-beautiful foundation to support your beautiful home, careful attention to cash flow and cash management is vital to building and preserving long-term wealth.

Tonya and Ray came to meet with me last week. In their mid-50s, they want to be sure they’re on track by saving enough for retirement and making smart choices about pre- and post-retirement taxation. They’ve also decided it’s time to get help with their investments (better late than never!). They came armed with lots of documentation: account statements, tax returns, and even a monthly budget. They seemed to have all their ducks in a row.

Then I took a closer look at the budget they had set in front of me. There were buckets for mortgage, utilities, insurance, and car payments. But everything I saw listed was a fixed expense. These are the expenses that are predictable and unchangeable. What was missing were buckets for their non-fixed expenses—the very items we can manage to achieve the two biggest goals of wealth management: eliminating debt and growing assets.

I asked the obvious question: “How are you spending your cash?” Tonya was quick with an answer: “It’s right there, in the ‘credit card’ bucket. We charge everything so we can easily keep track of it all.” Sure enough, there was a line item labeled ‘credit card’ with a budgeted amount of $2,000/month. “Ok, I asked, but where is that $2,000 going? Exactly?” They both chimed in with a lot of answers. Groceries. Gas. Restaurants. Car maintenance. Pet food. Prescriptions. Theatre tickets. Clothes. And they were clearly very proud that it was all contained in one manageable bucket. They assured me this method was working well for them.

But was it?

Luckily, in Tonya and Ray’s case, because these expenses were all on a single statement, we were able to track every expense. We drilled down into the details and looked at just a single month to see exactly where their cash was going. The numbers surprised us all. While they guessed they had spent $1,000 a month on meals and entertainment with another $1,000 slotted for necessities, the numbers told a different story. Two concert tickets at $125 each; monthly gym memberships of $120 each; one movie night at $36; four rounds of golf at $195 each (which they assured me was an unusual splurge), including two lunches at the resort for $90 a pop. While they were limiting themselves to one “nice” dinner out each week, they had spent $485 in that category, plus they’d added a handful of less extravagant meals, lunches, and lattes that racked up to $530. Total on meals and entertainment: $2,501. When we added in the other items included in the ‘credit card’ bucket (plus a few other surprises like $260 for housekeeping and $100 on supplements), what they were spending was more than double their original $2,000 monthly budget. Clearly, the budget wasn’t working after all. Without a method for closely managing cash, Tonya and Ray had been blind to the enormous rippling effect of their lack of daily money management and their invisible spending habits.  

Tonya and Ray are not alone. All too often I find that even the most financially diligent investors fail to have a basic financial planning document that includes a detailed record of their cash flow. Twisting arms doesn’t work (trust me, I’ve tried!), but by biting the bullet and following these three steps, they (and you) may finally get on the right path:

  1. Identify your top 3 goals—and make building an emergency cash fund #1. Regardless of the state of your finances, having cash on hand to cover unbudgeted expenses is key. Having an emergency fund equal to at least three months of your total household income is essential to avoid having to take on new debt in the future. Goals #2 and #3 might include paying off credit card debt, saving for a car, or funding next year’s vacation. (Read more on the power of an emergency fund in my blog When did it become ok to be financially illiterate?)

  2. Identify your income and your fixed expenses. Income is what you’re bringing home each month—salary, distributions, etc. Fixed expenses include mortgage or rent payments, insurance, utilities, and non-credit-card debt such as car payments. Be sure you know what’s coming in and what’s going out every month.

  3. Build your detailed budget. Err on the side of too much detail, and create a line item for every expense category. Separate your needs from your wants, and keep an eye on your top 3 goals from Step 1, includingcontributing to your emergency savings and paying yourself first for retirement (see my blog Getting back to basics in the New Year for more on this important topic).Be specific, and be certain your expenses don’t exceed your income! I encourage you to use a basic household budget worksheet like this one from Kiplinger. While there are apps available to help, none of them can do this work for you, and they can be more of a distraction than a benefit.

If the word “budget” reeks of giving up your spending freedom, rest assured that careful management of your cash flow is certain to have the opposite effect. By parsing your spending, aligning your spending habits with your personal goals, and projecting your cash flow into the future, you will gain the financial freedom you’ve been seeking all along—guaranteed. And the effects are long lasting too. When done well year after year, you’ll slowly but surely develop a comfort level with your actual life costs. You’ll realize you know whether something is “in the budget” without having to look at the numbers. And when changes happen like buying a home, changing jobs, growing a family, or ending a relationship? It will be that much easier to adjust to life’s transitions, whatever they may be, and rest easy knowing you (finally!) have your cold, hard cash under control.

Need help taking charge of your cash flow? This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  to schedule a time to meet. As always, I’m here to help!

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Facing divorce? 5 tips to protect your financial future

Facing divorce? 5 tips to protect your financial future

I don’t think there’s anyone among us who doesn’t have a story about 2008. Whether you lost a significant chunk of your retirement savings (at least temporarily), watched your parents struggle, or saw your colleagues panic and your friends lose their homes, it was a devastating period. The market has been volatile ever since even as it slowly and surely climbs to new highs. However, there’s a situation many people—especially older couples—face all the time that has the power to bring on even greater long-term financial devastation. What is this monstrous risk? Divorce.

Denise emailed me last week, and I was surprised to hear the elation and relief in her voice. “I’m finally doing it,” she said. “I’ve wanted a divorce for years, but I finally got the courage to make the leap. Even better, Doug feels the same, so I think it will be pretty easy. Amicable even.”

Before the words were out of her mouth, I felt my stomach drop. I hated to burst her bubble, but I also know the reality all too well. When couples divorce, no matter how “amicable” the situation may be, financial distress is inevitable. Add even the slightest bit of hostility to the mix, and you can be sure that distress will increase.

While I wish there was a way to ease the road ahead, or at least add even a tiny sugar coating, the fact is that there’s rarely a way to avoid the personal financial downturn that comes with divorce. No matter how much you’d both like a different outcome, this will be your “personal 2008.” Your assets will be divided in half. You will have two households to support, two retirements to fund and, if children are involved, two “family” vacations to pay for—all further compounded by legal fees to iron out custody details on top of everything else.

Don’t get me wrong: I would never wish for anyone to stay in a marriage only for financial reasons. Life is too short for a couple to stay in a non-productive, dysfunctional relationship. However, the sooner both parting parties face the fiscal realities of divorce, the sooner they can begin to make the appropriate adjustments to move forward financially. It’s a tough mandate considering the emotional turmoil in motion, but it’s a must.

Rather than breaking the news to Denise on the phone, we scheduled a meeting to look at the details. When we sat face to face, here’s what I shared:

  1. Be prepared for a lifestyle change. I’ve seen people stuck in faulty assumptions, unable to let go of lifestyle changes, even keeping an unaffordable house “for the kids’ sake.” Often, downsizing in every way is not only optimal, but mandatory. If your happiness is based on living in the same place and affording the same luxuries, you’re in for a rude awakening. This shift is huge, and you need to understand the ramifications at the outset.
     
  2. Be realistic about your budget. Yes, this includes supporting two households, and that will eat up a major chunk of any expendable income, but mortgage and rent are not the only factors. As soon as you have a clear picture of your monthly income, you’ll need to create a budget that matches that number to avoid an increase in debt due to overspending.
     
  3. Include retirement in your planning. Couples who remain together can anticipate the reduced expenses that come with a single dwelling and shared expenses. Going solo means you’ll need even more to support your non-earning years. If you’re over 50, consider making “catch-up” contributions to your retirement. If that’s not possible, at the very least, be sure you are contributing every month to help ensure you don’t outlive your assets as a single.
     
  4. Don’t count on the promises of your attorney. While I do hope that most divorce attorneys are striving to act in your best interest, we’re all optimists at heart and, even more so, some attorneys will tell you only what you want to hear. Wait until your case is closed to spend money that’s not yet in your pocket. Once your Marital Settlement Agreement is final, you’ll have an accurate sense of your financial capacity. Until then, keep your wallet closed as much as possible.
     
  5. Keep an eye on the details. If you’re on your spouse’s health insurance plan, those benefits may end when your divorce is final. If you decide to sell your home post-divorce, you may face capital gains taxes if the appreciation is greater than $250K. However, if you sell “incident to divorce,” you and your spouse may both qualify for a $500K exemption from capital gains instead of just half that amount. (A transfer is incident to divorce if it occurs within one year after the marriage ceases, or if it is related to cessation of the marriage.) Details add up and have a major impact on your financial health—now and down the road. Work with a professional advisor to be sure you know which decisions matter most, and when.

When Denise and I finished talking, she wasn’t on the same cloud nine. Reality checks are rarely comfortable. But she did tell me she felt much more prepared for what was to come. “It may not be as easy as I thought it could be,” she said, “but I’m still certain we’ll all be happier over the long term. I know I have some serious homework to do!”

If you’re facing divorce, I urge you to take a close look at your finances and make the best possible decisions as you walk this new path. Whether you’re wearing rose-colored glasses or are mired in the common distress and shock of it all, taking time out to review the money side of the equation may make it much easier to find joy as you enter a whole new phase of life. 

Need help working out the financial details of your divorce?  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  me to schedule a confidential session. As always, I’m here to help.

 

 

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09 November 2016

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All written content on this site is for information purposes only. Opinions expressed herein are solely those of Lauren S. Klein, President, Klein Financial Advisors, Inc. Material presented is believed to be from reliable sources and we make no representations as to its accuracy or completeness. Read More >