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Lauren's Blog

Lauren’s blog covers topics that impact your finances, your family, and your future. Is there a topic you’d like Lauren to tackle? We’d love your suggestions and feedback.

Not ready for retirement? It’s only too late if you don’t start now!

Not ready for retirement? It’s only too late if you don’t start now!

Years ago, I hit a major crossroads. I had been restructured out of a corporate job I loved, and while I was shell-shocked by the reality of being a victim of workplace ageism, I knew in my heart that I had something important to do in my life. There was a mission I had yet to find; it was out there, somewhere, waiting for me to uncover it.

Thankfully, I stumbled across Barbara Sher’sbook: It’s Only Too Late If You Don’t Start Now: How to Create Your Second Life At Any AgeOf the many books I’ve read, this guide was one of the most transformative. It empowered me, and it gave me the fierceness I needed to take charge of my life. I soon found my mission that had been lurking in the shadows, and Klein Financial Advisors was born.

Last week, I found myself sharing that story with Susan and Scott. My newest clients, they are on their own urgent mission: to build a nest egg… starting at age 57.

When we first sat down together, I could feel their apprehension. It was no surprise. They had told me they had minimal savings and were unprepared for retirement. Smart, responsible people, they had been dealt a tough hand financially. With three kids to raise and aging parents to care for, they were among the many who lost their homes in the financial crisis. As an independent contractor, Scott’s income had ebbed and flowed, and Susan had left her job at a local university to wrangle three teenagers and help her mother with some health issues. Since then, they’ve been focused on staying out of debt (cheers to that!), and even though Susan is now back at work, they haven’t been able to save a dime for retirement. Today, they’re ready to do something about it. Susan was blunt: “Are we just too late?”

My answer was simple: “It’s only too late if you don’t start now.” With that, we rolled up our sleeves and settled in for some serious planning. And it all began with making these four important promises to themselves:

Promise #1: Claim Social Security at age 70 (not a day earlier!)
Smart Social Security claiming is an absolute must. While most everyone is eligible to begin receiving Social Security payments at age 62, between age 62 and FRA (Full Retirement Age) at age 66 or 67 (depending on your birth year), your benefits increase 5% each year.Even better, between FRA and age 70, your benefits increase by 8% each year you delay, plus an annual cost of living adjustment. Therefore, if your monthly benefit at age 62 is $750, waiting to file until your 70th birthday nearly doubles your monthly check to $1,320. Plus, because spousal benefits are based on the other partner’s benefit amount, by waiting until age 70 to claim benefits for the highest earner both spouses’ benefits are increased by 8% per year. Your goal is to secure a higher monthly income over the long term, and delaying Social Security is one of the most effective ways to do it.  

Promise #2: Rethink your retirement age.
Most of us grew up with the idea that we would retire at 65… or earlier if we could swing it. It’s time to relegate that 20th century idea to the history books. People are living much longer. In 1970, the average U.S. lifespan was 67 for men and 74 for women. Today those averages have climbed to 76 for men and 81 for women.[1] That means that here in Lake Wobegon (where we’re all above average), your investments must meet your needs for an extra decade—at least. Instead of making your retirement goal 65, banish that idée fixe and put a plan in place to keep earning into your 70s.

Promise #3: Focus on building enough cash reserve to make work optional.
Saving cash can be challenging, but only because we’re usually rooted in habits and behaviors we’ve been honing for decades. Building a nest egg in your later years can be done, but it takes focus, diligence, and sacrifice. Get rid of debt first. More than anything else, debt has the power to hurt your future self.  Reconsider adopting your parents’ or grandparents’ depression-era frugality tips. You may have laughed then, but thrift serves your goal to eventually to make work optional. Again, it’s only too late if you don’t start some serious thriftiness today. Build that cash reserve dollar by dollar.

Promise #4: Don’t give away your future to your children.
Saying no to adult children isone of the biggest challenges you’ll face. For decades, the #1 priority for parents is to take care of their kids. You’ve been holding their hands since they opened their eyes for the first time. How can you stop now? You can. And you must. Especially when your retirement savings is lacking or nonexistent. (For more on this hot topic, see my blog post Money Rules.) If you haven’t saved for college tuition for your kids, work with them to create a plan that doesn’t put your future at risk. If you have 20-somethings living at home—a common scenario these days—they should be contributing financially to the household. When your adult child needs money, he or she really does have other resources. It’s time to stop being “the bank of Mom and Dad” and start making your future your new #1 priority.

Recognize that it is not too late, as long as you start now! I just read this great NPR article that talks about getting kids to pay attention, something Mayas in Guatemala are doing better than most. The writer quotes psychologist Edward Deci at the University of Rochester, who says that one of the most important ingredients for motivating kids is autonomy. In his words, "To do something with this full sense of willingness and choice." It’s a lesson in motivation at any age.

Susan and Scott have made that choice. They are catching up on savings through IRAs. They’ve stopped financing their kids. Susan is considering increasing her income with a better paying job or a side gig. They are both committed to right-sizing their lives so they can build the nest egg they will need in the future. They have a plan, and they are building momentum every day.

Whether you are just starting to build your retirement nest egg or your savings is not where you need it to be, make the choice today to actively create a financially secure “second life.” It’s only too late if you don’t start now.

[1] According to the National Center for Health Statistics 2016 data.

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5 reasons to consider a Reverse Mortgage (even before you retire!)

5 reasons to consider a Reverse Mortgage (even before you retire!)

When you live in Southern California, the equity in your home is often one of the most valuable assets in your portfolio. Not only are property values above the national average, but also home prices have tended to rise quickly (just talk to anyone who bought a home even five years ago!). Yet, few people see home equity as a “spendable” asset. But if you’re looking for a reliable source of cash today or 10 years hence, a Reverse Mortgage can be an ideal tool to turn your home equity into a tax-efficient source of income—even if you still owe money on your home.

Surprised? So was Lucy when we talked last month. I had already done the research and knew that she could qualify for a Reverse Mortgage. It seemed like the perfect way to access the cash she needed to take care of a half dozen home repairs she had been putting off since her husband died two years ago. As a retired widow, paying the $2,000 mortgage was cutting deeply into her resources, and she felt too cash constrained to set herself up for more bills to pay.

I suggested a Reverse Mortgage because I knew it could give Lucy the financial comfort she needed to maintain her home—whether she decided to stay put for the next 15 years or sell—and that it would also allow her some much-needed financial freedom. When I mentioned the idea, her eyes got wide. She couldn’t believe her ears. “Before Jack died, he told me a Reverse Mortgage was the last thing he would do,” she told me. “He said they were a scam.” She went on to say that using a Reverse Mortgage wasn’t something she even wanted to consider. “It’s too much of a gamble. I don’t want to risk losing my home.”

I can’t blame Lucy (or Jack, for that matter) for being wary. In the early days of Reverse Mortgages, they earned a bad reputation for being a shady product used by slick salesmen to take advantage of desperate, cash-strapped seniors. Despite late-night television ads that make them sound too good to be true, Reverse Mortgages really can be an important part of your overall retirement income strategy. In fact, while a Reverse Mortgage isn’t right for everyone, when used correctly and strategically, it may be just the solutionyou need to manage cash flow and protect your portfolio in retirement. Here are 5 reasons why it makes sense to consider a Reverse Mortgage today:

  1. A Reverse Mortgage is similar to a Home Equity Line of Credit—but with no monthly payments.
    A Reverse Mortgage is similar to a HELOC in that it provides a line of credit based on your home equity. Like a HELOC, that line of credit can be taken as a lump sum, in scheduled monthly payments, or reserved for future draws. However, while a HELOC requires you to pay back the loan with monthly payments over a set period, a Reverse Mortgage requires no monthly payments to the bank. Instead, the loan balance and interest accrues over time. Payment to the bank can be delayed until12 months after you leave your home.

     
  2. You can use a Reverse Mortgage to pay off your current mortgage.
    For many retirees in our “high rent” part of Southern California, paying even a reasonable mortgage on a fixed income can be a struggle. What’s great about a Reverse Mortgage is that because it’s based on the actual value of your home, you can use the money to pay off your current loan amount, potentially increasing your cash flow by thousands of dollars each month. You can also use a Reverse Mortgage to finance the purchase of a new home.

     
  3. It’s relatively easy to qualify for a Reverse Mortgage.
    Applying for a traditional mortgage or HELOC can be a challenge, especially if your income is limited. To qualify for a Reverse Mortgage, you must be at least 62, your home must be your principal residence, and you must have sufficient income to pay property taxes, homeowners insurance, and basic home maintenance. That’s it. Since you aren’t responsible for making monthly loan payments, even a less-than-perfect credit score or limited assets should not impact your eligibility.

     
  4. A Reverse Mortgage can help protect your portfolio.
    If the bulk of your retirement savings is held in an IRA, withdrawing assets before age 70½ will result in a sizeable tax burden. Using a Reverse Mortgage is a highly tax-efficient way to supplement your income and manage your cash flow. Because the money is a line of credit based on the value of your home, there are no taxes to pay. It can also give you the funds you need to delay Social Security until age 70, allowing you to take advantage of the Delayed Retirement Credit that increases your Social Security payment by 8% for each year you delay and nearly doubling your monthly Social Security income. (For more on this, see my blog Social Security & Women: Tackling the Challenges.) Plus, an available line of credit can prevent you from being forced to sell stocks from your portfolio should you need additional cash during a down market.

     
  5. Reverse Mortgages are regulated to protect the borrower.
    Lucy’s fear of losing her home is not uncommon. With a traditional mortgage, if the loan exceeds the value of your home, the bank can foreclose on your property and force you out of your home. Luckily, Reverse Mortgages are designed and regulated to protect seniors from this very scenario. A Reverse Mortgage is a “non-recourse loan,” which means that if the value of your home drops dramatically (think 2008!) you will never owe the bank more than the value of the loan. That alone can be a great source of financial security in your later years.

Of course, no line of credit is completely free of costs. Like traditional mortgages and HELOCs, Reverse Mortgages charge fees such as interest payments, origination fees, and closing costs. Reverse Mortgages also require a government-mandated, upfront mortgage insurance premium equal to 2% of the value of your home, plus 0.5% of the loan balance. But because these costs are rolled up into the loan amount, you pay no out-of-pocket expenses.

For most borrowers, that 2% is a small price to pay for the flexibility of turning their home equity into a spendable cash resource. And if you use the Reverse Mortgage to pay off your existing mortgage, you may even offset this cost completely. Do keep in mind that a Reverse Mortgage is best if you plan to stay in your home for the next five or more years. Otherwise, the upfront costs may outweigh the benefit.

One last thing to remember is that the best time to get a Reverse Mortgage is before you need it. A Reverse Mortgage should never be used as a last resort when all of your other assets have been depleted. Instead, consider applying for your line of credit while interest rates are still low so you can lock in a great rate. Having this flexible resource available if and when you need it can help turn your home equity into a powerful and strategic financial planning tool for decades to come.


A Reverse Mortgage is a complex planning tool that should be used as part of a carefully constructed wealth management plan. If you need help deciding if a Reverse Mortgage makes sense for you, let’s talk. As always, we’re here to help! 

 

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Rethinking retirement in the “gig economy”

Rethinking retirement in the “gig economy”

There’s a movement going on in America, and it’s something retirees, and those even close to retirement, should start studying—hard. It’s called the “gig economy,” and it’s changing how people think about almost everything. Work. Play. And even the fine line in between the two. It’s changing how we pay and get paid for both, and it’s transforming how people look for work and how the work itself is getting done. Whether you’re looking for extra income to help fund your retirement, or you simply want to work to keep your mind and body active in your later years, understanding the gig economy and how it functions is vital to rethinking your retirement.

Anyone who has been forced to look for work recently can tell you firsthand how the gig economy has flipped the traditional work landscape on its head. Old-fashioned resumes have been replaced by LinkedIn profiles, and even the idea of finding a conventional “job” is fast becoming a thing of the past. Companies like Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb have provided a way for almost anyone to earn an income, as well as a whole new way for consumers to find and pay for services.

These companies aren’t alone. Today, there’s a website or an app that offers on-demand services of almost any kind imaginable. DoorDash delivers breakfast, lunch, or dinner from your favorite restaurant to your door at the click of a button. TaskRabbit lets you order up a “trusted and local handyman” within an hour. Dogvacay gives pet owners online access to 5-star pet sitters and dog walkers. And there are just as many services for professional freelancers. Upwork helps companies hire web developers, writers, accountants, and virtual assistants. Guru is the place to find professionals in management and finance, engineering and architecture, and sales and marketing. And UpCounsel is the go-to site for legal services.

Of course, every one of these services requires individuals to provide skills. Whether they are driving for Uber or DoorDash, putting together IKEA furniture, or helping a business crunch the numbers, these workers make up a growing workforce that is already in place. That means that if you thought serving up lattes at your local Starbucks was the only job in town for anyone “post-career,” you’re happily mistaken. The gig economy is taking over, and that’s good news—at least for those who get it and can adapt to this new reality.

The business school at UCI certainly gets it. My friend Howard Mirowitz is on the advisory board at the school’s new Beall Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The center is devoted entirely to inspiring innovation and entrepreneurship in the 21st century. Here students learn both why it’s important to become an entrepreneur, as well as the processes and tools to help turn that dream into a reality. The center fills a need that’s positively exploding. While being an entrepreneur may have sounded like a lofty dream a decade ago, it’s fast becoming mandatory for anyone hoping to succeed in an environment where it’s predicted that 43-50% of workers in the US will be freelancers by 2020. Let me repeat that: 43% to 50% of workers will be freelancers. Whatever your age, if you’re looking for work today, you are part of that statistic. Which means that now is the time to figure out what you have to offer the world and how that fits into what the world needs from you, and then begin to create your opportunities as part of this new, dynamic workforce.

For those of us who grew up in a business world where “climbing the corporate ladder” was the norm and playing by the rules led to a coveted lifetime pension, this new era can be pretty daunting. It requires flexibility and agility, not to mention a good dose of personal marketing savvy and technology know-how as well. So where do you start? It may be a moving target, but these five steps can help you take those first important steps:

  • Start to think differently.Rather than thinking about getting a “job,” make a list of all of your skills—both skills you learned in the traditional workplace and those you learned in life. Next, examine your list and circle the things you would like to continue doing and what someone else wants enough to pay you for. One of these skills may very well be your next “gig.”
     
  • Get a mentor.There’s no doubt about it: millennials have the gig economy down pat. To them, it’s just the way the world works now. If you need help figuring out how you can offer your skills, or even what skills people might be looking for, ask someone younger to serve as your mentor. You’ll be amazed at the knowledge they can offer.
     
  • Market yourself. Create a great LinkedIn profile that uses keywords that match your skill set to be sure people can find you online (learn all about LinkedIn keywords here). No, you don’t need to include dates that might “age” you or list every job you’ve ever had. Focus on what’s relevant to what you’re marketing today. If there’s already an on-demand service that matches your skills (think Upwork and Guru), explore how to get listed. There are even services which provide that service, helping to market everything from your Airbnb rental to your skills in human resources or healthcare.
     
  • Save madly.While there are many upsides to the gig economy, the downside is that it isn’t always consistent. Even if you do find the perfect niche, there may be off times when your services aren’t needed, or the need may change entirely, causing you to have to rethink your focus once again. Having a sizeable emergency fund can help offset potential gaps in income.
     
  • Be flexible.When I left my own corporate career, I realized there was a whole set of skills I needed to learn to succeed at my new goal. If you have some but not all of the skills you need for your new “job,” don’t let that scare you away. And if your interests change, know you have the freedom to change your work focus as well.

The gig economy may be replacing the traditional workplace, but what powers it are three things that will never be replaced: people, knowledge, and skills. By taking a look at the knowledge and skills you bring to the table, you may find that working in the gig economy can help your golden years shine that much brighter. How fun is that?!

 

 

 

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All written content on this site is for information purposes only. Opinions expressed herein are solely those of Lauren S. Klein, President, Klein Financial Advisors, Inc. Material presented is believed to be from reliable sources and we make no representations as to its accuracy or completeness. Read More >